A very fun evening!

Action Camera and Tamron lenses sponsored a photo walk in Virginia City yesterday evening. Ken Hubbard, the walk leader, is a national representative for Tamron lenses. I’ve had the privilege of taking night photography workshops with Ken previously, so I was excited to explore Virginia City in the evening light.

The town is quiet at 8 p.m. A few cars on the street but, with most stores closed, the pedestrian traffic was very light. VC’s street lights are beautiful, and cast an orange glow on everything. I chose building exteriors and store windows as my subjects for the evening. The store windows offered challenges with interior lights creating hot spots the images and competing with the ambient light from the street lights. I set the Canon 6D Mk II on Manual, played with ISOs of 100, 200, and 800, and various apertures. Shooting on a tripod, I bracketed exposures. This allowed me to be choosy in my selection of images to combine while processing. I also experimented with black and white for several of the images, as you will see in the images below.

Walking up Main Street and I saw these bottles in the window, backlit by the room lights. Next time, I’ll use a smaller aperture to extend the depth of field and make the bottles a little sharper. Of course, shooting at an angle through vintage glass may not allow full focus on the bottles.

One of the store fronts. I tried to mask the interior light using the item nearest the glass, with limited success (in my mind). I worked this image in both color and black and white, and decided I like the b/w version best.

Another of the store fronts. I had better success using the ambient light in this image. I combined 4 of the bracketed exposures and then applied a filter from the Nik Collection for the final image. I liked the color version of this image. Another challenge was the condition of the glass in the store windows – this glass wasn’t too bad.

My favorite image from the evening! This restaurant on the south end of town was wonderful. When I first saw this scene, there was a pickup on the right encroaching into the building. When I walked by again a couple hours later, the truck was gone and I was able to get this. Again, I compared the color version to the black and white version, and chose the b/w. I cropped in a little to reduce clutter on the sides, and had to decide if the fluttering bunting in the center of the image was worth worrying about. (You can’t take your eyes off it now, can you?)

Low light photography is challenging but fun – I experiment with is occasionally. The smoke around Virginia City wasn’t horrible, but did limit my shooting. The moon came up and was a beautiful reddish orange from the smoke, but I didn’t even try for moon shots mostly because of the smoke. Take a chance and go out in the late evening, and just experiment. You will learn a lot and might surprise yourself. Be careful where you go. Take a friend to watch your back. Yes, I’ve found myself in places where I shouldn’t have been without backup so I speak from experience.

On a positive note, the music from one of the bars made the evening pleasant! Enjoy – PHOTOROGR

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My favorite critter…

As a Wyoming native, I spent my formative years with images and representations of the Bison, although we always called them Buffalo at the time (kind of like Pronghorn…we always called them Antelope). They have always been one of my favorite animals and on my bucket list since I took up serious photography. I spent several months in Wyoming this spring, and had several opportunities to take pictures of the Bison there.

If you’re traveling to or through Wyoming on I-80, stop by Bear River State Park on the Wyoming-Utah border. Take Exit 5 (maybe 6) and turn south. Bear River maintains a Bison herd. In March, I stopped and took some shots in a snow storm.

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One day, Dad and I made a run to Fort Collins CO. On the way back to Cheyenne, we stopped by the Terry Bison Ranch (Exit 2 on I-25) because the Bison were fairly close to the frontage road. While I was shooting over the fence, a nice guy in a Jeep drove up and engaged me in conversation. Turns out he was the ‘Boss’ at the Terry Bison Ranch, and he told me to drive on in and get some pictures. ‘Don’t get out of the car and don’t drive too close’ were his only words of warning. I was able to make these images.

7PS6406-e2-w7ACR6365-e1a-w7ACR6382-e1-w7ACR6368-bw-e1-w7ACR6349-e1a-w7ACR6424-e1a-wAs many of you have experienced,  I use this image as my ‘Rolling On The Floor’ (ROFL) emoji. It just seems appropriate.

Of course, I’ll make more Bison images when we head to other parts of Wyoming next summer. This will have to hold you until then.

Enjoy – PHOTOROGR

I must be a very bad boy…

…because two times today I was accosted for not posting in a long time. Twice! In one day!! Holy cow!!!

Well, it has been a long time since my last post. I apologize and make no excuses. Now that I’m home, I’ll be going through the images from the last 9 months and you’ll see more from me.

In a feeble attempt to make up for my transgression, I offer the following images of Pronghorn Antelope for your viewing pleasure. Pronghorn outnumber humans in Wyoming (or maybe it just feels that way!) and can be found throughout the state. They are commonly found in the plains areas. Pronghorn can run as fast as 45 mph, which makes them one of the fastest land animals.

These images were made from the side of the road in the southeast corner of Wyoming (around Cheyenne) and just across the border in northern Colorado.

Enjoy – PHOTOROGR